Student Profiles

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Name: Yueying Wang Bloomer      

Year: Class of 2016

Hometown: GuangZhou, China

Undergrad: University of Maine at Presque Isle

Majors: Criminal Justice and Accounting

What did you do prior to coming to the University of Maine School of Law?

I was a bankruptcy secretary at Perkins Thompson, PA, in Portland from December 2012 until August 2013. I also taught Chinese culture through cooking at Baxter Academy in Portland in the winter of 2012 and I have been a court interpreter for the State of Maine for both Cantonese and Mandarin since 2009.

Why did you choose to attend the University of Maine School of Law?

Although I am ‘from away,’ I consider Maine as my new home. I love Maine’s crisp air, beautiful water and genuine people. Maine is the best place to live and to raise a family.

What has been most helpful to you in making the adjustment to the life of a Maine Law Student?

The support from my family and the upperclassmen and faculty members of the law school.

What is one thing that has surprised you about Maine Law?

I was surprised by the generosity of the upperclassmen and the support from the faculty. For example, one person gave me his old textbooks for free, and someone gave me all sorts of tips on how to navigate through school. Also, I could not talk enough about the teaching assistants who are so helpful and patient. As a parent, I could not make it to every TA session. The teaching assistants would email the material when I was absent and answer my questions, even during weekends. It could not get any better.

Are you involved in extracurricular activities, either on or off campus? What are they?

I am an active member of the Court Interpreter Program for the State of Maine. I do both Cantonese and Mandarin interpretation for the judicial system for various legal matters.

When you are not at school, how do you like to spend your time?

I spend the majority of my time with my two children, Katelin (5 year-old) and Jasper (3 year-old). We love taking walks on the Eastern Promenade. I am also teaching both Cantonese and Mandarin at home.

Portland has a reputation for its vast array of food options. Do you have any favorite restaurants or grocery stores?

I must say, as a native Chinese, I love the little Hong Kong Market at the corner of Congress and St. John in Portland. They have my favorite almond cakes and bitter gourds and many other Chinese goodies that I could rave about all the day long. One thing I would like to highlight is that, during mid-autumn festival, usually either in September or October, I could find authentic mooncakes, which only appear once a year at the store. I would not miss them for the world. 

What is your favorite thing to do in Portland?

For a foodie like me, trying out different restaurants definitely trumps anything. For the size of Portland, there is a surprisingly large selection to satisfy my palate.

For someone who is considering attending Maine Law, how would you describe the student community here?

The student community here is very supportive and friendly.  It is also very enriching due to its diversity. Every student brings something special to the table, which means we can all learn from each other.

If you could tell a prospective student one thing about Maine Law, what would it be?

Bring plenty of winter clothing because winters at Maine Law are very cold! But the kind, friendly, and family-like atmosphere will warm you up posthaste.

 

Name: Amanda Hemmerich

Year: Class of 2016

Hometown: Hollis, NH

Undergrad: Reed College

Major: Biology (minor Political Science)

Grad school: Indiana University, School of Public and Environmental Affairs

How did your life and academic experiences shape your decision to pursue a career in law?

I grew up hiking and playing in the woods, and I knew at a young age that I wanted to have a career that connected me to the natural environment. I studied science because I wanted to understand natural processes, and firefighting sparked an interest in the merger of policy with science. Graduate school gave me the opportunity to study ecology and forestry alongside courses like public law and management.

My work as an environmental planner exposed me to the challenges of how legislation needs to keep pace with continually changing ecosystem processes, and it is with this interest I decided to pursue a career in law.

Before coming to Maine Law, you worked for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and also as a wildland firefighter with the Bureau of Land Management. What was your most memorable experience on the “hotshot crew”?

It was hard to choose just one significant experience because my time as a wildland firefighter left such a strong impression upon me. Some of the more memorable experiences included being dropped off by helicopter or hiking into remote locations to either dig line or monitor the fire.

The crew worked on a fire adjacent to an Anasazi (Indian) site – when the fire was under control, we were given permission to visit the ruins, which were built into the side of the cliff and were completely untouched by the fire. Some other memorable experiences included acting as Incident Commander of my first fire in Yosemite National Park, and running from a hive of bees (while getting stung numerous times) during a prescribed burn in the giant sequoia grove.

 Why did you choose to attend the University of Maine School of Law?

 I feel very fortunate that I managed to put down roots in a city that has a law school, let alone one that offers a small, collaborative environment. The Admissions Office made a huge impression on me when I visited – they were genuinely interested in my goals and supportive about balancing part-time work on a full course load.

 What has been most helpful to you in making the adjustment to the life of a Maine Law Student?

 Fellow classmates and my community. I appreciate that throughout my week, friends “check in” with me and ask how things are. Most tell me they miss seeing me and I have one friend who now gives me a weekly hug!

 When you are not at school, how do you like to spend your time?

 I enjoy spending time outdoors, hiking with my dog, biking, running, climbing, skiing, etc.  I also love lifting weights and I have a great group of friends with whom I work out on a regular basis.

 Portland has a reputation for its vast array of food options. Do you have any favorite restaurants or grocery stores?

 I go to different stores for different needs, and when I can, I buy directly from farmers. I am gluten-free and enjoy cooking, so I haven’t ventured out that much, but I love Silly’s and any restaurant that offers crème brulee!

 What are some things that have surprised you about living in Portland?

 The strong sense of community and abundance of things to do. After college, and with the exception of graduate school, I seemed to move every six months or so. Living in Portland for over 2 years is the longest I have stayed in one place since high school. I love the diversity of Portland – its historic homes, charming neighborhoods, and cobblestone streets, while also offering the perks of a larger city, like concerts.


 

 

Sara Murphy

 

Name: Sara Murphy
Year: Class of 2014
Hometown
: Born in Erie, Pa., moved to Martha’s Vineyard, Mass., in high school
Undergrad: University of Southern California

When Sara Murphy and her partner, Peter, drove across the country in 2009, with two kids in car seats and a Big Wheel tricycle strapped to the roof of their Subaru, Los Angeles lost a talented actor. Portland, Maine, gained a talented law student.

It’s not that Sara didn’t love acting anymore. She always has. Through the BFA program at USC, she made connections with independent filmmakers and reputable equity theater companies. The work, however, was inconsistent, and the pay was meager. Sara worked about 18 weeks of the year doing what she loved, and 34 weeks waiting tables. As Sara puts it, “Cue law school.”

 “I’ve done some seriously ridiculous things in auditions before,” she says. “Everything from standing there silently, doing absolutely nothing while holding a soda can, to screaming at the top of my lungs because I had to pretend I had just seen a werewolf, to reciting Shakespeare while doing cartwheels.”

 She and her partner wanted to raise their kids close to family in New England, and they found jobs in Portland. Sara worked as an actor for Portland Stage while studying for the LSAT. Sara has excelled at Maine Law. After her 1L year she was a Bernstein Fellow in the Portland District Court for the Hon. Keith A. Powers (Maine Law ’73).Then, as a rising 3L in the summer of 2013, she was selected for the coveted Charles Harvey Trial Immersion Fellowship, as well as a summer position at Pierce Atwood.

 After graduating, Sara will clerk for the Hon. Leigh I. Saufley (Maine Law ’80), Chief Justice of the Maine Supreme Judicial Court.

Kasey Boucher

 

Name: Kasey Boucher
Year: Class of 2016
Hometown: Lewiston, Maine
Undergrad
: Boston University
Major: B.S. in Business Administration; dual concentration in finance and law

What did you do prior to coming to the University of Maine School of Law?

Last year, I worked for State Street as a portfolio accountant and played women’s professional hockey for the Boston Blades.

 You have been a standout ice hockey player. Can you tell us a little bit about your journey as an athlete, beginning with high school? Do you still play?

I definitely had a different high school experience than most people. I went to North American Hockey Academy (NAHA) in Stowe, Vermont, which was only during the hockey season. The classes were one-on-one tutoring and were based on the classes that I was enrolled in back at Lewiston High School. Going to NAHA opened up the opportunity for me to reach personal dreams, including playing hockey in college for Boston University.

 I also received the opportunity to play for the U-18 Team USA national team in 2008, with whom I won a gold medal at the IIHF world championships. I also was fortunate enough to represent the country at both the U-22 and senior team levels for various international tournaments. Last year I played for the Boston Blades, which is the only American team in the Canadian women’s hockey league. I am extremely grateful for the experience I had with hockey, and it has had a huge impact on the person I am today. Unfortunately, I have not been playing this year, but I would like to start again soon at a much less competitive level so I can just play for fun.

 Why did you choose to attend Maine Law?

It definitely helped that Maine Law was close to home, but that was not the only factor in my decision. All the feedback I heard about the school was great. The small size also definitely helped. Although I loved how big Boston University is, law school is a greater step toward my career. I really liked the idea of having a small school where I could form personal relationships with the professors and a large percentage of the student body, rather than just being another number in a larger school. 

 What has been most helpful to you in making the adjustment to the life of a Maine Law Student?

It was actually a lot easier of an adjustment than I was expecting. I knew it was going to be a lot of work, but it is certainly manageable. I think the availability and approachability of staff and other students has been an enormous help for me.

 When you are not at school, how do you like to spend your time?

I am certainly a coffee addict, so I often do my school work either at a coffee shop or next to my coffee pot at home. When I’m not doing work, even though Portland is not huge in size, there are so many options for anyone. The entire city has a warm and friendly vibe. The drive from my hometown is less than an hour, and I still am consistently learning about new restaurants or places to go.

If you could tell a prospective student one thing about Maine Law, what would it be?

When I was a prospective student, I knew Maine Law had a reputation of being a great school, but I didn’t realize how great it was until classes began. The faculty and students are always willing to help one another. All of my professors are approachable and truly want their students to succeed. Lastly, the camaraderie among the small group of students really makes a great learning environment for everyone.

Ari Solotoff

 

Name: Ari Solotoff
Year: Class of 2015
Hometown: Great Neck, N.Y.
Undergrad: University of California, Berkeley

Ten years ago, when Ari Solotoff started out his career in orchestra management, he developed a Sunday evening routine, mapping out the week ahead by reviewing a list of goals. This level of planning helped him become a top executive with The Philadelphia Orchestra, an internationally acclaimed ensemble with more than 100 musicians, a staff of 55 and hundreds of volunteers. And it’s the same approach Ari has used as a student at Maine Law.

The son of public school music teachers, Ari began playing the piano at age five, and the oboe at age 10. Ari worked as an executive for orchestras in Pensacola, Florida and Louisville, Kentucky. He also served from 2006-2010 as the Executive Director of Maine’s own Portland Symphony Orchestra. In 2010, Ari joined the management team of The Philadelphia Orchestra, and he helped the orchestra successfully reorganize through a Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Ari was impressed by the skill, creativity and dedication of the lawyers with whom he worked.

“They embodied qualities that I have always strived for in my own work, and they inspired me to consider a career in law,” Ari says. “Once I made the decision, it was clear to me that Portland was the best place to start our family and to leverage my previous experiences in orchestra management into law practice.”

 Ari has been a judicial intern for Justice Jon D. Levy of the Maine Supreme Judicial Court and also serves as a teaching assistant for Civil Procedure and Constitutional Law. He will join Bernstein Shur in 2014 as a summer associate.

Isabel Mullin

 

 

Name: Isabel Mullin
Class of 2016

Hometown: Cape Elizabeth, Maine
Undergrad: Denison University, Granville, Ohio
Majors/Minors: Major in economics; Minor in political science

What did you do prior to coming to the University of Maine School of Law?

I attended Denison University from 2006 through 2010. During my undergraduate years I had the opportunity to intern in Congresswoman Pingree’s office in Portland, Maine, for a summer. I also lived in Santa Elena, Venezuela for a summer volunteering with an organization that provided therapeutic horseback riding lessons.

 

Following graduation, I began working as a financial representative with Fidelity Investments.  I worked at Fidelity for just under two years.  I eventually realized I did not want a career in the finance industry, and I moved back to Maine where I resumed work in Congresswoman Pingree’s congressional office as a Staff Assistant and as the Campaign and Finance Assistant for her 2012 reelection campaign.  Following the election, I transitioned to a legislative aide position with the State Senate Democratic Office in Augusta where I worked for four state senators helping with constituent service and legislative work.

 

 Why did you choose to attend the University of Maine School of Law?

I chose the University of Maine School of Law for a two main reasons: first, once I moved back to Maine I didn’t want to leave again.  I am convinced that this is one of the most amazing places on earth, with beaches, ski mountains, and extremely kind people with an incredible work ethic.  There isn’t a day that goes by that I am not grateful I stayed here. 


The second reason I chose Maine Law is that I loved the culture of this school.  I was told that it had a supportive environment with rigorous academics, and that couldn’t be more true.  My classmates are some of the most incredible people, and will bend over backwards to help one another out. 


What has been most helpful to you in making the adjustment to the life of a Maine Law Student?

Again, I would have to reiterate the amazing culture at Maine Law.  My classmates consistently help each other out and accessing anyone (students, professors, staff) at the school is as easy as knocking on their door or sending an email.  When I have a question, the staff, professors, and administration go out of their way to help answer it.


Are you involved in extracurricular activities, either on or off campus? What are they?

On campus, I participate in the Women’s Law Association (WLA) and the Maine Association for Public Interest Law (MAPIL).  I am also serving as a 1L Representative to the Student Bar Association (SBA) where I serve on the Events Committee and the Services Committee.        


In my time off campus, I volunteer on a number of political campaigns and I am a member of the current Emerge Maine class, an organization that recruits and trains Democratic women to run for office.


Portland has a reputation for its vast array of food options. Do you have any favorite restaurants or grocery stores?

I love Rosemont Market and Bakery, which has a few locations throughout Portland and is known for its local produce and foods.  It is too hard to identify my favorite restaurant because it seems like a new establishment opens every day.  The options are endless and incredible.  Let’s just say I never go hungry.


What is your favorite thing to do in Portland?

My favorite thing to do in Portland is look up at the sky at night.  Portland is a small city, so the moon and stars on a clear night are absolutely breathtaking.


For someone who is considering attending Maine Law, how would you describe the student community here?

I would describe the student community as just that, a community.  Every student has a unique background and experience that they bring to Maine Law.  We don’t only spend our days in the classroom together, but students are constantly organizing events and gatherings that are open to the entire student body. 


Students also invite one another to their non-Maine Law events.  For example, we have a rugby player in our class that invites everyone to his games, we had a student organize a dinner and movie night, and we have classmates who lend their cars so that other students can go vote.  This is just a small picture of the student community at Maine Law.  I am still in my first semester, but I already know that my classmates will not only be my future colleagues, but also some lifelong friends.

 

Name: Carson Phillips-Spotts
Class of 2016
Hometown: 
Atlanta, Georgia
Undergrad:
Colby College
Major:
Latin American Studies

What did you do prior to coming to the University of Maine School of Law?

I worked as a paralegal in the Immigration Services Department of the Latin American Association in Atlanta, Georgia. The Latin American Association is a non-profit organization that provides a variety of services to low-income Latino families in the greater Atlanta area. My experience there really fostered my interest in pursuing a career in law.

 Why did you choose to attend the University of Maine School of Law?

The size of the school was a big draw for me. Law school, and in particular the first year of law school, can be very hectic. Having a small, collaborative student body really helps to reduce that stress.

 What has been most helpful to you in making the adjustment to the life of a Maine Law Student?

The availability of the faculty, staff, TA’s and upperclassmen has been a huge help. There is an abundance of resources at your disposal as a 1L. If you have questions about anything from housing options to a difficult concept in a certain class, there is always someone willing and able to help.

 What is one thing that has surprised you about Maine Law?

The wide array of interests of my classmates.  Getting to know members of the 1L class has really opened up my eyes to the breadth of the career goals that they have.  From public interest law, to personal injury law, the career interests of my classmates run the gamut.

 When you are not at school, how do you like to spend your time?

I played football in both high school and college, so I like to try and remain competitive. Maine Law Basketball has some good pick-up games on Tuesday and Thursday nights that are pretty fun.

 Portland has a reputation for its vast array of food options. Do you have any favorite restaurants or grocery stores?

Nosh Kitchen Bar on Congress Street is one of my favorites.  Nosh has phenomenal sandwiches and wraps and great lunch specials. I would definitely recommend it.

What is your favorite thing to do in Portland?

Besides studying? Hanging out with friends. Although Portland isn’t a huge city, it offers a lot in terms of dining/entertaining options.  Because this is my first year living here, I am still discovering places on a daily basis.

 For someone who is considering attending Maine Law, how would you describe the student community here?

In a word, I would describe the student body as collegial. I think members of the 1L class understand and embrace the newness of the experience that is law school, and they take a “we’re in the same boat” approach to dealing with new challenges. The upperclassmen, having gone through what we are going through now, are very empathetic to our situation and are always willing to offer guidance and advice.

 

Kevin Decker

Name: Kevin Decker
Class of 2014
Hometown: Shapleigh, ME (live in Portland now)
Undergrad: Dartmouth College, class of 2008

 

"... I could get a high quality education from an excellent faculty in a close-knit community..."

Why did you choose to attend the University of Maine School of Law?

There are many factors that led me here, and it was a complicated decision. But I’ll try to boil it down to a few key reasons: quality, location, and money.  I spoke with quite a few current Maine Law students and recent graduates who had great things to say about their law school experience.  As I became more familiar with Maine Law, the more I realized that I could get a high quality education from an excellent faculty in a close-knit community (which has been the case).  I’m originally from Maine, and although I had left the state for school and to work in Boston for a few years, I knew I wanted to return to Maine and start my legal career in Portland.  I knew going to Maine Law would provide me the best access to Maine’s legal community, and I haven’t been disappointed on that point. And, finally, Maine Law by far made the most sense financially.

 

What has been most helpful to you in making the adjustment to the life of a Maine Law student?

I think a key element to staying sane as a law student is to retain a “real life” outside of school. I try leaving time open for friends and family, as well as things like running and watching football games. “Real life” becomes especially important during finals, to deal with the persistent and exhausting feeling that there is always something you should be doing to prepare for exams.

 Are you involved in extracurricular activities, either on or off campus? What are they?

I’m on the Maine Law Review.  That means that I spent a lot of time in the beginning of the semester cite-checking articles for the upcoming issue. Right now, I’m working on writing a comment for the law review about federalism and energy transmission.  Also, as part of the Academic Support Program, I am a teaching assistant for a first-year course called “Legislation & Administration,” which involves holding weekly group study sessions and office hours.

 

Portland has a reputation for its vast array of food options. Do you have any favorite restaurants or grocery stores?

That’s the toughest question you’ve asked me. If I was absolutely forced to pick a favorite restaurant, I’d have to say Local 188, but I’ve had many great dining experiences in Portland at other restaurants.  If I’m looking for something less formal, I like to go to Silly’s or Duckfact, or grab a slab from Micucci’s or a slice at Otto.  And I start everyday with coffee from Coffee by Design.

What are some things that have surprised you about living in Portland?

I’m surprised by the fact that I’ve lived here for almost two and a half years, and even though Portland is a relatively small city, there are still many parts of it that I haven’t explored. I’m also always surprised at the number of people who come out for the Art Walk every first Friday of the month, even in the winter. And I was pleasantly surprised when, this past summer, the city was able to attract the attention of Mumford & Sons, who performed on the Eastern Prom overlooking Casco Bay, a few hundred yards from my apartment – that was pretty amazing.

For someone who is considering attending Maine Law, how would you describe the student community here?

I’d describe the students here as very supportive.  The community is small as far as law schools go, which means both that you have a chance to get to know your classmates and that students tend to cooperate and help each other rather than engage in unhealthy competition.

Ali Tozier

Name: Ali Tozier
Class of 2015
Hometown: Falmouth, Maine
Undergrad: Williams College

"...the student community here is one of the best parts about Maine Law."

Why did you choose to attend the University of Maine School of Law?

I came to University Maine School of Law because of the location, the high quality of education, and the small student body. The professors are top-notch and I find the students to be intelligent, engaging and kind. Having a class of less than 100 means that we all get to know each other well; since law school can be stressful, having a tight community is incredibly valuable.

What has been most helpful to you in making the adjustment to the life of a Maine Law student?

The friendly nature of both the professors and the students.

Are you involved in extracurricular activities, either on or off campus? What are they?

Yes. I am a co-chair of the Women’s Law Association. I am a member of the International Law Society and helped organize the International Law Weekend in New York City recently. I do two work-study jobs during the week, am starting to mentor a high school student and I also try to make time for yoga.

 

Portland has a reputation for its vast array of food options. Do you have any favorite restaurants or grocery stores?

Yes! Restaurant: Duck Fat; Grocery Store: Trader Joes

Although you are originally from Maine, you’ve been away for some time. What are some things that have surprised you about living in Portland?

Growing up in Falmouth, I actually didn’t go into Portland that often. Now I feel like I have discovered a whole new world! I have lived in Los Angeles, Boston and London, each for at least a year, and I have also spent a significant amount of time in DC and NYC, but still I find Portland to be incredible. It has the culture, music and coffee shop scene that I Iove about cities. However, I find its small size and cozy feel make it more manageable than other, more expansive places I’ve lived. It is hard to be lost here. Portland has a beautiful and creative energy about it and living here makes me feel a part of something.

As a 1L, how would you describe your experience thus far?

Well, I find it hard to describe. It is unlike anything I have ever experienced before. I was told it would be overwhelming and that 1Ls sometimes would have breakdowns… but now I really get what people meant. It is hard to manage your time as a 1L. I had a fairly demanding undergrad experience, but this is harder than that! Knowing you will be cold-called during class means you can’t just skim your readings. It has been a great lesson in time management. All that said, I still really love it. I feel engaged with the world again and I appreciate how much my professors expect from me. I find the material fascinating (something I was anxious about before starting school) and I also really like my peers. We are all experiencing the same stress and are helping each other through it. I definitely made the right decision to come here.

For someone who is considering attending Maine Law, how would you describe the student community here?

I would say the student community here is one of the best parts about Maine Law. Isn’t there some assumption that law students are supposed to be ultra competitive with each other or something? Well, that’s not what you’ll find here.

The idea of tearing someone else down to get ahead doesn’t seem to exist: at least, I haven’t noticed it here. Instead, I find my peers to be helpful, nice and just plain remarkable people! We are quick to share notes, grab coffee, and support each other in any way. I am always greeted with kind smiles when I walk into class and that makes a big difference to my day. I’m also glad I’m not going to be in as much debt as some of the other students out there, which is an important consideration for anyone applying to law school. All in all, Maine Law is a fun place to learn and I’m grateful for the friendships, professors and the opportunities I have here.

Ben Birney

Name: Ben Birney
Class of 2013
Hometown: North Yarmouth, ME
Undergrad: Williams College

"What sets Maine Law apart for me is the quality of the academic community."

I want to base my legal career in Maine if possible, and, at any rate, want to spend as much time here as possible while getting my law degree. Portland is a beautiful, safe, and clean, it’s well worth the effort (and the winter!) to establish myself in the Maine legal community. I can think of no better place to raise child.

What has been most helpful to you in making the adjustment to the life of a Maine Law student?

The relationships I built with fellow law students in my first year were absolutely essential to making the adjustment and doing well.  In my first year at Maine Law, everybody shared in an intense, difficult, but incredibly rewarding experience.  Drawing support, companionship, and intellectual challenge from my fellow students was a cornerstone of my first year experience, and has continued to serve me well. The best advice I can give to a new first-year student is to treat your classmates well and be ready to learn from them.

Aside from this, succeeding in my first year at Maine Law required three other things: Discipline, focus, and commitment.  Discipline, because there were many times when the work was long and hard, and finding time to do it around the rest of life was a serious challenge.  Focus, because the work required it, and because life is distracting.  Commitment, because it would have been easier—but much less satisfying—to have done the minimum and just gotten by.  To get the most out of Maine Law, I had to invest heavily in these things.  Because I made that investment, I am very happy with my Maine Law experience.

Are you involved in extracurricular activities, either on or off campus? What are they?

I served as vice president of the Maine Law Student Bar Association and as vice president of the International Law Society. I am also the Managing Editor of Maine Law Review, a legal writing teaching assistant, and, outside of Maine Law, a part-time software developer.

What are some things that have surprised you about living in Portland?

Although it has many of the best characteristics of larger cities, Portland also has wonderful open, green spaces to enjoy and explore.  I have loved walking, running, and bicycling on and in the city’s many parks, pathways, and even forests.  It is also easy to access open and beautiful rural land very close to the city.

What has been your best experience at the University of Maine School of Law?

Preparing for exams during my first year, both in the fall and spring semesters, was an outstanding experience. I say this because I witnessed and took part in a very high degree of cooperation and peer support among my classmates. Exams are stressful and difficult, particularly in law school. What impressed me about the experience was how well people came together, supported each other, helped each other learn and study, and forced themselves and their peers to rise to the challenge. Rarely have I seen so many people so dedicated both to their own success and the success of the people around them.

For someone who is considering attending Maine Law, how would you describe the student community here?

What sets Maine Law apart for me is the quality of the academic community. My classmates, as a group and as individuals, possess a remarkable combination of intelligence, camaraderie, and competitiveness, all balanced with a remarkably compassionate human touch. We are all living through an amazing and expanding time in our lives, and the community of students and faculty is incredibly positive. Students support each other when they don’t have to; when it would be easier to just let the other person go it alone; when it’s not convenient. Yes, we compete, and compete hard; but we also cooperate and help each other. To me, that sets Maine Law apart from a great many other law schools, from whose students I hear just the opposite story.

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